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No 30. Nick Kyrgios

The talented and frequently unpredictable Kyrgios finished the season ranked 30 giving him his 5th straight season in the top 35. He played two outstanding tournaments winning at the ATP 500 series level in Acapulco and Washington. A combination of injuries and withdrawals coupled with meltdowns meant he did not reach a Grand Slam quarter-final for the 4th straight year.

Despite his mental shortcomings on the court, I have no doubt he will continue to be a top 30 contender in 2020.

Rather than bearing witness to Kygios’s talent every time he steps onto the court, too often we’re subjected to tantrums. Four words shape my opinion of him:

if – as in “If, if, if doesn’t exist,” as per Rafael Nadal in his post-match press conference after playing Kyrgios at Wimbledon 2019; depressing; arrogant, and deflector.

If: If only he would do the hard work and commit to tennis 100 percent. If not love it, then learn how to use it and maximize the earnings from it to provide a means to do what he does love. According to him, this is his NK Foundation. Anyone who wants to help kids and especially underprivileged or sick kids must have something going for them. If only he could channel this passion and remember he is playing for the kids every time he walks onto the court or gives an interview.

Depressing: Watching tennis must be sad for those fans who get duped by his sometimes ingenious play. Whenever he is building momentum with form, and you start believing in him, he so often fails to follow through. For example, when scheduled to meet someone like Novak Djokovic – who he loves to beat – in a later round, we get excited by the possibility. However, he’ll blow up and lose in an early match against a player he should comfortably beat and misses the anticipated moment.

Arrogant: He seems cocksure, which sometimes is fun when he does it with cheeky humour but too often is childish. His sullen arrogance comes across terribly, particularly in interviews. For example, when a reporter asks a reasonable question, his reply might be, “Next question,” or, “You’re the expert, you tell me”.

Deflector: When the going gets tough on the court, he too often starts whingeing and even blaming others for his performance. The worst is when he can’t overcome his mental frailty and says something like, “I’m done, bro; I’m f***ing done” during an outburst. He can’t handle whatever injustice he feels is upon him, so he acts out. Excuses like blaming the crowd for being too loud or the umpire being on a power trip are just weak. It’s all down to his attitude. When he’s feeling especially aggrieved, we get incidents like the chair-throwing and default that occurred in Rome this year.

Likes: Nick has a fantastic serve, that is not only powerful but is backed up by different strategies, spins and paces. I love it when he launches a bazooka forehand and especially if accompanied by an aerial launch. Kyrgios possesses a nasty forehand drop shot that is built on a good disguise. When he does guest commentary at a tournament like AO, he has profound insights and special-comments which are music to a hard-core tennis fans ears. I like seeing Nick also use his surprisingly high tennis IQ on the court. Kyrgios makes no secret that he thinks Federer is the best player ever and that he enjoys getting under Djokovic’s and Nadal’s skin. I don’t mind that he does that if it makes him play better against them.

Dislikes: When he can’t cope with whatever is the source of his actual problem and takes it out by deflecting and causing scenes on the court. He is prone to behave like this in interviews as well. It seems that whenever he is asked to reflect on himself by a reporter, he will get snarky and deflect.

Areas for improvement: His return is below average, and his backhand rally shot is mediocre. His forehand, while it can be spectacular, can also leak errors. Even his volley while not weak is at best average. His homework is to find out and deal with whatever is the real source of his problems that cause him to deflect and act out. Only once he has done that, only once he has addressed his technical flaws and achieved the fitness levels required, will he be able to contend at a slam and obtain a ranking befitting his talent. He might even get something out of watching 30 for 30 Rodman: For Better or Worse on ESPN. There is no point giving Nick tennis homework, he would think he is too good for that.

Perhaps Nick could do something like Wawrinka did because it’s OK to fail. ”Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better.”

By fullontennis

ATP fan and recreational tennis warrior. I like to live a plant based life, keep fit, stay healthy and improve my tennis.

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